Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez contacter Claire Vallée au 902 844 2477

Shingle Evaluation

 

Like all things in life asphalt shingles degrade and wear out over time. As asphalt shingles age, the petroleum or other soluble base of the asphalt evaporates through exposure to heat and washes out through exposure to water from rainfall and and snow melt.  This “drying out” of the asphalt causes it to progressively lose its softness, flexibility, and strength.  The loss of softness, flexibility, and strength reduces the ability of the shingle to accommodate thermal movements and resist damage from impacts. The aging of the shingles and evidence of reduced softness, flexibility, and strength begin with the surface graying and surface hardening of the asphalt.  It progresses with cracking in the asphalt, shrinkage of the shingle especially the tabs, warping or deformation of the shape, granule loss, embrittlement, and breakage.  In extreme cases, the asphalt becomes so brittle, not unlike fresh potato chips, that the shingles may become easy to break or shatter.  Shingles in this condition are clearly in need of replacement and are well beyond their service life. The following is the first of five short lists of characteristics exhibited by aging asphalt shingles Balding  Balding is the extensive loss of granules such that the underlying asphalt coating is exposed.  Balding is the result of normal aging and weathering of the shingles over the years, but it is accelerated by inadequate bonding of the granules to the asphalt coating, repeated scuffing from excessive foot traffic, prolonged wetness, and/or some other manufacturing defect.  Balding usually does not result in immediate loss of water shedding ability, but it reduces the potential service life of the shingle because the asphalt is exposed directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with sunlight and water. Blistering Blistering appears as bubbles on the surface of the shingles or small relatively circular cavities that penetrate into the asphalt.  Blisters are due to the vaporization and expansion of the volatiles, such as, kerosene or water, in the asphalt.  The vaporization and expansion occur when the shingles are heated by ambient temperatures, the radiant heat of
sunshine, and/or excessive heat from poorly vented attic.  When the blisters of the bubble break or are worn away by normal weathering or foot traffic, a cavity is exposed in the asphalt.  Blistering is the result of a shingle manufacturing anomaly, but is commonly increased by exposure of the shingles to excessive heat from a poorly ventilated attic.  Blistering usually does not result in immediate loss of water shedding ability, but it reduces the potential service life of the shingle: when the blisters break, small spots of the asphalt and mat are exposed directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with sunlight and water. Buckling Buckling is the localized heaving of the shingle surface due to the expansion and/or the swelling of the shingle mat in combination with the restraint of the shingle mat by the roofing nails, an adjoining shingle, and/or the asphalt sealant.  Buckling that extends side to side on a shingle tab immediately restricts the water shedding ability of the shingle and reduces the potential service life of the shingle because it creates a ridge that may act as a dam that allows water to accumulate and soak into the shingle.  Prolonged rainfall onto a shallow slope with buckled shingles may allow penetration of ponding runoff soaks through the shingles.  Shingles are not water tight like a swimming pool membrane.  Ponded runoff also exposes the asphalt and mat directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with water. Breakage Breakage is the complete dislodging and separation of a portion of shingle due to the fracturing of the shingle mat from the normal aging, embrittlement, weathering and/or deterioration of the shingle over the years.  Breakage may be accelerated by heavy foot traffic and/or hand lifting of an already aged, brittle, deteriorated, and weathered shingle.  Breakage may result in immediate loss of water shedding ability.  If breakage is due to degrading of the shingle material from normal or premature aging, it has little effect on the potential service life of the shingle because the shingles are already beyond their service life.  Corner breakage is usually due to the lifting of a corner of a brittle shingle with one’s finger or the dog ear bending at
the corner when the bundle of shingles was dropped on its corner. Clawing Clawing is downward curling at the corners of the shingles.  Clawing commonly occurs when the bottom of the shingle shrinks relative to the top of the shingle.  Clawing is increased by the exposure of the bottom side of the shingle to excessive heat from a poorly ventilated attic.  Clawing immediately restricts the water shedding ability of the shingle and reduces the potential service life of the shingle because it creates humps that may act as a dam that allows water to accumulate and soak into the shingle.  Prolonged rainfall onto a shallow slope with clawed shingles may allow penetration of ponding runoff soaks through the shingles.  Shingles are not water tight like a swimming pool membrane.  Ponded runoff also exposes the asphalt and mat directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with water. Cracking Cracking of shingles appears as relatively straight line fractures in the shingles.  Cracking is due to the normal aging, shrinkage, embrittlement, weathering, and/or deterioration of the shingle over the years.  Cracking is especially promoted where the shingle is stretched and the asphalt is exposed by the bending of the shingles over a ridge, staples, or other discontinuity in the surface of the roof deck.

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Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez contacter Claire Vallée au 902 844 2477

Shingle Evaluation

 

Like all things in life asphalt shingles degrade and wear out over time. As asphalt shingles age, the petroleum or other soluble base of the asphalt evaporates through exposure to heat and washes out through exposure to water from rainfall and and snow melt.  This “drying out” of the asphalt causes it to progressively lose its softness, flexibility, and strength.  The loss of softness, flexibility, and strength reduces the ability of the shingle to accommodate thermal movements and resist damage from impacts. The aging of the shingles and evidence of reduced softness, flexibility, and strength begin with the surface graying and surface hardening of the asphalt.  It progresses with cracking in the asphalt, shrinkage of the shingle especially the tabs, warping or deformation of the shape, granule loss, embrittlement, and breakage.  In extreme cases, the asphalt becomes so brittle, not unlike fresh potato chips, that the shingles may become easy to break or shatter.  Shingles in this condition are clearly in need of replacement and are well beyond their service life. The following is the first of five short lists of characteristics exhibited by aging asphalt shingles Balding  Balding is the extensive loss of granules such that the underlying asphalt coating is exposed.  Balding is the result of normal aging and weathering of the shingles over the years, but it is accelerated by inadequate bonding of the granules to the asphalt coating, repeated scuffing from excessive foot traffic, prolonged wetness, and/or some other manufacturing defect.  Balding usually does not result in immediate loss of water shedding ability, but it reduces the potential service life of the shingle because the asphalt is exposed directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with sunlight and water.
Link to BP Roofing Visualizer Service Link to BP Roofing Visualizer Service

Building Products of Canada Visualizer

Service.

Us your own house and see what  looks best

on you house!

Blistering Blistering appears as bubbles on the surface of the shingles or small relatively circular cavities that penetrate into the asphalt.  Blisters are due to the vaporization and expansion of the volatiles, such as, kerosene or water, in the asphalt.  The vaporization and expansion occur when the shingles are heated by ambient temperatures, the radiant heat of sunshine, and/or excessive heat from poorly vented attic.  When the blisters of the bubble break or are worn away by normal weathering or foot traffic, a cavity is exposed in the asphalt.  Blistering is the result of a shingle manufacturing anomaly, but is commonly increased by exposure of the shingles to excessive heat from a poorly ventilated attic.  Blistering usually does not result in immediate loss of water shedding ability, but it reduces the potential service life of the shingle: when the blisters break, small spots of the asphalt and mat are exposed directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with sunlight and water. Buckling Buckling is the localized heaving of the shingle surface due to the expansion and/or the swelling of the shingle mat in combination with the restraint of the shingle mat by the roofing nails, an adjoining shingle, and/or the asphalt sealant.  Buckling that extends side to side on a shingle tab immediately restricts the water shedding ability of the shingle and reduces the potential service life of the shingle because it creates a ridge that may act as a dam that allows water to accumulate and soak into the shingle.  Prolonged rainfall onto a shallow slope with buckled shingles may allow penetration of ponding runoff soaks through the shingles.  Shingles are not water tight like a swimming pool membrane.  Ponded runoff also exposes the asphalt and mat directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with water.
Breakage Breakage is the complete dislodging and separation of a portion of shingle due to the fracturing of the shingle mat from the normal aging, embrittlement, weathering and/or deterioration of the shingle over the years.  Breakage may be accelerated by heavy foot traffic and/or hand lifting of an already aged, brittle, deteriorated, and weathered shingle.  Breakage may result in immediate loss of water shedding ability.  If breakage is due to degrading of the shingle material from normal or premature aging, it has little effect on the potential service life of the shingle because the shingles are already beyond their service life.  Corner breakage is usually due to the lifting of a corner of a brittle shingle with one’s finger or the dog ear bending at the corner when the bundle of shingles was dropped on its corner. Clawing Clawing is downward curling at the corners of the shingles.  Clawing commonly occurs when the bottom of the shingle shrinks relative to the top of the shingle.  Clawing is increased by the exposure of the bottom side of the shingle to excessive heat from a poorly ventilated attic.  Clawing immediately restricts the water shedding ability of the shingle and reduces the potential service life of the shingle because it creates humps that may act as a dam that allows water to accumulate and soak into the shingle.  Prolonged rainfall onto a shallow slope with clawed shingles may allow penetration of ponding runoff soaks through the shingles.  Shingles are not water tight like a swimming pool membrane.  Ponded runoff also exposes the asphalt and mat directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with water. Cracking Cracking of shingles appears as relatively straight line fractures in the shingles.  Cracking is due to the normal aging, shrinkage, embrittlement, weathering, and/or deterioration of the shingle over the years.  Cracking is especially promoted where the shingle is stretched and the asphalt is exposed by the bending of the shingles over a ridge, staples, or other discontinuity in the surface of the roof deck.
Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez contacter Claire Vallée au 902 844 2477

Shingle Evaluation

 

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Like all things in life asphalt shingles degrade and wear out over time. As asphalt shingles age, the petroleum or other soluble base of the asphalt evaporates through exposure to heat and washes out through exposure to water from rainfall and and snow melt.  This “drying out” of the asphalt causes it to progressively lose its softness, flexibility, and strength.  The loss of softness, flexibility, and strength reduces the ability of the shingle to accommodate thermal movements and resist damage from impacts. The aging of the shingles and evidence of reduced softness, flexibility, and strength begin with the surface graying and surface hardening of the asphalt.  It progresses with cracking in the asphalt, shrinkage of the shingle especially the tabs, warping or deformation of the shape, granule loss, embrittlement, and breakage.  In extreme cases, the asphalt becomes so brittle, not unlike fresh potato chips, that the shingles may become easy to break or shatter.  Shingles in this condition are clearly in need of replacement and are well beyond their service life. The following is the first of five short lists of characteristics exhibited by aging asphalt shingles Balding  Balding is the extensive loss of granules such that the underlying asphalt coating is exposed.  Balding is the result of normal aging and weathering of the shingles over the years, but it is accelerated by inadequate bonding of the granules to the asphalt coating, repeated scuffing from excessive foot traffic, prolonged wetness, and/or some other manufacturing defect.  Balding usually does not result in immediate loss of water shedding ability, but it reduces the potential service life of the shingle because the asphalt is exposed directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with sunlight and water.
Link to BP Roofing Visualizer Service Link to BP Roofing Visualizer Service

Building Products of Canada Visualizer

Service.

Us your own house and see what  looks best

on you house!

Blistering Blistering appears as bubbles on the surface of the shingles or small relatively circular cavities that penetrate into the asphalt.  Blisters are due to the vaporization and expansion of the volatiles, such as, kerosene or water, in the asphalt.  The vaporization and expansion occur when the shingles are heated by ambient temperatures, the radiant heat of sunshine, and/or excessive heat from poorly vented attic.  When the blisters of the bubble break or are worn away by normal weathering or foot traffic, a cavity is exposed in the asphalt.  Blistering is the result of a shingle manufacturing anomaly, but is commonly increased by exposure of the shingles to excessive heat from a poorly ventilated attic.  Blistering usually does not result in immediate loss of water shedding ability, but it reduces the potential service life of the shingle: when the blisters break, small spots of the asphalt and mat are exposed directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with sunlight and water. Buckling Buckling is the localized heaving of the shingle surface due to the expansion and/or the swelling of the shingle mat in combination with the restraint of the shingle mat by the roofing nails, an adjoining shingle, and/or the asphalt sealant.  Buckling that extends side to side on a shingle tab immediately restricts the water shedding ability of the shingle and reduces the potential service life of the shingle because it creates a ridge that may act as a dam that allows water to accumulate and soak into the shingle.  Prolonged rainfall onto a shallow slope with buckled shingles may allow penetration of ponding runoff soaks through the shingles.  Shingles are not water tight like a swimming pool membrane.  Ponded runoff also exposes the asphalt and mat directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with water.
Breakage Breakage is the complete dislodging and separation of a portion of shingle due to the fracturing of the shingle mat from the normal aging, embrittlement, weathering and/or deterioration of the shingle over the years.  Breakage may be accelerated by heavy foot traffic and/or hand lifting of an already aged, brittle, deteriorated, and weathered shingle.  Breakage may result in immediate loss of water shedding ability.  If breakage is due to degrading of the shingle material from normal or premature aging, it has little effect on the potential service life of the shingle because the shingles are already beyond their service life.  Corner breakage is usually due to the lifting of a corner of a brittle shingle with one’s finger or the dog ear bending at the corner when the bundle of shingles was dropped on its corner. Clawing Clawing is downward curling at the corners of the shingles.  Clawing commonly occurs when the bottom of the shingle shrinks relative to the top of the shingle.  Clawing is increased by the exposure of the bottom side of the shingle to excessive heat from a poorly ventilated attic.  Clawing immediately restricts the water shedding ability of the shingle and reduces the potential service life of the shingle because it creates humps that may act as a dam that allows water to accumulate and soak into the shingle.  Prolonged rainfall onto a shallow slope with clawed shingles may allow penetration of ponding runoff soaks through the shingles.  Shingles are not water tight like a swimming pool membrane.  Ponded runoff also exposes the asphalt and mat directly to the deteriorating effects of prolonged contact with water. Cracking Cracking of shingles appears as relatively straight line fractures in the shingles.  Cracking is due to the normal aging, shrinkage, embrittlement, weathering, and/or deterioration of the shingle over the years.  Cracking is especially promoted where the shingle is stretched and the asphalt is exposed by the bending of the shingles over a ridge, staples, or other discontinuity in the surface of the roof deck.